Secondary

After-school

  • Dig for Sustainability – learning from the older generation

    The Cambridge Global Collective set up a project to explore how their wartime heritage relates to current concerns about sustainability and climate change. The project, based at the Harambee Centre, worked with a core group of 30 young people to discover how the World War II ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign could influence current-day practice.

    Whilst this project was undertaken by a youth group, it could be replicated within schools or after-school clubs.

  • GLADE Film Club

    GLADE (The Centre for Global Learning and Development Education) in Ilminster, Somerset, teamed up with a local youth centre to show issue-based films as a way to reach out to new young people and explore global issues.

    Whilst this project was undertaken by a youth group, it could be replicated within schools or after-school clubs.

Citizenship

Cross curricular

  • Transition, peer education and the global dimension

    Manchester Development Education Project (DEP) used peer education methodology and the global dimension to address issues of transition from primary to secondary school.

  • Dig for Sustainability – learning from the older generation

    The Cambridge Global Collective set up a project to explore how their wartime heritage relates to current concerns about sustainability and climate change. The project, based at the Harambee Centre, worked with a core group of 30 young people to discover how the World War II ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign could influence current-day practice.

    Whilst this project was undertaken by a youth group, it could be replicated within schools or after-school clubs.

  • Education is about their future, not our past
    Whitefriars First and Middle School serves a very diverse community in Harrow, north-west London, and over two thirds of pupils have a home language other than English. The school is part of a learning network which links schools in Masindi, Uganda, and Harrow, England. As well as working on joint curriculum projects, the school has integrated global learning across the curriculum.
  • Challenging extremism locally and in the wider world

    Accrington Academy in Lancashire worked with local artists to tackle extremism, through an intensive programme of dialogue with students, reflecting on local and then wider world issues. This led to the creation of a public art installation and a Community Ambassador programme.

  • Using the arts and global issues to re-engage young people and improve behaviour

    A group of Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) within Birmingham’s Behaviour Support Service held an issue-based, cross-curricular theme week with a global focus.

  • Positive images project – understanding refugees

    Getting students to understand the real-life experiences of refugees and asylum seekers can develop their critical thinking and open-mindedness.

  • ‘Do it with passion’; a school cluster link with Kenya

    A curriculum-focussed school partnership project can reach across a number of curriculum areas, including Maths, Science, Geography, English, Art, Drama, Music and ICT.

English & drama

Geography

ICT

  • Making ICT Real

    Today’s young people are ‘digital natives’, having grown up alongside computers, mobile phones and the internet. How can we capitalise on this to help them develop as global citizens?

Mathematics

  • World Food Day lesson at Winterbourne Academy

    Nicola Richardson teaches Mathematics at The Ridings’ Federation Winterbourne International Academy (TRFWIA), an 11-18 co-educational Academy in rural South Gloucestershire. For World Food Day she gave Key Stage 3 students (age 11-14) the chance to see how different families around the world have very different resources available to buy food.

Religious education

  • A link with Mexico

    Exploring religious festivals develops cultural understanding and enables young people to reflect on their own experiences.

Science

Whole School

  • Climate conscious schools

    School councils give pupils a voice and can be a good way for them to realise how they can make a difference to global issues such as climate change, both as individuals and through joint action.

  • Liverpool Schools in One World

    How can school councils – students elected to represent the views of all pupils – get involved in global issues?

  • A Whole School Approach

    How do you get teachers from different departments to commit to the global dimension? Benton Park School, with support from Leeds Development Education Centre (DEC), worked across six subject departments to develop new, engaging lessons which would incorporate global dimension concepts.

  • A student’s viewpoint

    Sixteen year old Paul Lichtenstern from North London International School explains what has helped him to develop an understanding of global issues.